Posted by: Susan | April 9, 2010

The Magic of a Master Mind Group

I’ve been fortunate this past year.  I belong to a master mind group – it’s called the Master Coach Council – and we meet weekly for about an hour to help one another grow and manage our businesses.  In the process, we learn new techniques to serve our clients better, tap into business alliances we’d otherwise never have access to, and build powerful friendships along the way. 

Our mastermind meetings aren’t difficult to participate in.  But what happens as a result is almost magical and it’s something that successful people have been instinctively using for a very long time.  You see, it’s all about simple math:  basic multiplication.

“Why use one mind when two can do the job three times faster!”

Where did the concept of mastermind come from?  Way back in 1908 a guy named Napoleon Hill was commissioned by Andrew Carnegie (then the richest man in the world) to interview the 504 most successful people of his day. The objective was to find what “success” had in common.

His book, ‘Think and Grow Rich’ finally came out in 1937 and outlined the ’13 Principles’ that Hill’s long years of research had identified as being common to every successful person.

One of those principles was that of the Master Mind Group.  Hill demonstrated that no successful person does it alone. All are surrounded by people who can help them, advise them, criticize them, encourage them, motivate them, inspire them and spark them to be better than they could ever be on their own.  

He goes even further to suggest that people with a master mind group around them can tap into an intelligence that is beyond themselves – that the coming together of two or more minds focused on a single purpose creates a fusion of intellect that can never be achieved by the individuals on their own.

Through my Master Coach Council, I can attest this concept really works.  So much so that I now have the honor of facilitating other master mind groups for my clients.

Associating with a master mind group is not meant as a means of letting others do your thinking for you, far from it. It’s meant to stimulate your own thinking through the association with other minds.  No one knows everything. The more sympathetic minds you get together – that is, minds working for a common purpose – the more related information is going to be available. Great ideas are a combination of related information.

If you decide to join a master mind group, pick your group with care. Make sure the members are people you respect and who are hard working and conscientious. You’ll have a lot of fun, you’ll reach your goals just that much sooner, and you may even create a little magic of your own!

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Responses

  1. Great post Susan!

    You are such a valued member of our mastermind.

    Thank you for being a blessing to me.

    Love 1+1=3. One horse pulls 500 pounds of weight. Two horses together pull 1500.

    Imagine having 5-10 people in a mastermind pulling together and what that would produce.

    You are a professional and have a heart of gold.

    To your genius,

    Eiji

  2. Susan, this is a great post. I agree wholeheartedly with you about mastermind groups. The first I heard of it was from Napoleon Hill also, but it goes back even further, according to Buzan’s Book of Genius, which ranks the top 100 geniuses of history. Among the 20 characteristics common to these great geniuses are two types of mastermind groups: mastermind group (real), which are live people you associate with; and mastermind group (internal)which are role models with whom we are not personally acquainted. Who wouldn’t want to learn from great geniuses such as Leonardo da Vinci, Thomas Jefferson, Ben Franklin, William Shakespeare, Sir Isaac Newton, and many more?

  3. Susan,

    What a beautiful inspiring and thoughtful post that was. I like how you linked the cat story to your message. It was lovely to read, you really nailed it with that story! Best to you. Carole


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